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Archive for the ‘Hand Tools’ Category


Lie-Nielsen Beveled Edge Chisel

Lie-Nielsen Beveled Edge Chisel Bevelled edge chisel are used for chopping and paring and are especially good at getting into tight angles such as dovetails. Lie-Nielson produce a chisel which has a socket handle which make it easy to change handles and enable the handle to be offset making paring much easier.

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How to Sharpen a Marking Knife.

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How to Sharpen and Use Mortice Chisels


Mortice chisels are different to other woodworking chisels in that the sides need to be ground to form them into a sharp cutting edge. As the chisel is driven into the wood the bevel pushes the chisel forward cutting the sides of the mortice.

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How To Use A Coping Saw


Cutting with a coping saw is simple. You need the correct grip and stance. The cut is made with a pulling stroke and the blade turns within its own kerf to make a curved cut.

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Saw Sharpening (Part 3)


The saw blade is removed from the vice and a sharpening stone is used to very lightly rub down each side of the blade to take off any high spots and even out the set. Test the sharpness and set by sawing in a slighty upward stroke away from yourself, using your thumb nail as a guide

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Saw Sharpening (Part 2)


The teeth are sharpened using a triangular file. The action and angles used are identical for each tooth. The teeth are reset using a special tool. After setting the teeth a file or stone is run alng the blade to ensure the teeth are even.

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Saw Sharpening (Part 1)


When sharpening a saw blade there are three angles on each tooth that need to be considered, rake, fleam and slope. The angles vary depending on the purpose of the saw and the timber being cut.

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Use of a Try Square

A try square is the most commonly hand tool in the woodwork shop. It is used to mark lines at right angles to a face or edge. It is also used to ensure one surface is at right angles to another.

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Marking Gauge

The marking guage consists of four parts; the stem, the stock, the spur and the thumb screw. The distance you want marked on your timber is measured from the stock to the point of the spur using a ruler. The stock is the placed against the peice of wood and the spur is lighty pushed into the wood and pulled along the edge leaving a neat line paralell to the edge.

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Lie-Nielsen Mortise Chisels


Mortice chisels are designed for the tough job they are required to do and so are much thicker than ordinary chisels

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